The Rewind Technique

The Rewind Technique (also known in Neuro Linguistic Programming (NLP) as the “The Fast Phobia Cure” or “The Visual-Kinesthetic Dissociation Technique”) is an advanced tool to decondition phobias and trauma (such as PTSD). It’s efficacy has been assessed in many academic papers such as the work by Gray & Liotta. It’s safe, gentle and without the drugs, scare tactics, psychological archaeology and exposure used by the older and less effective phobia treatments.

The Rewind Technique is now widely accepted as the most reliable and effective treatment for all kinds of phobias, even long-standing and severe ones. It’s probably the single most reliable and effective tool in psychotherapy today and is being used more and more as a front-line treatment for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder including trauma caused by accidents, assaults, war and witnessing critical incidents.

If you have ever seen someone being almost instantly released from their phobia on TV and thought “Wow, how did they do that?” you can bet the therapist used The Rewind Technique.

So how does it work?

A phobia is driven by a pattern-matching process whereby the unconscious mind creates “fear templates” around “dangerous” things or situations to try and keep you safe from the imagined threat in future. It then broadly matches these patterns to more and more situations as a phobia develops.

What The Rewind Technique does, in a very creative way, is interfere with those patterns – it subtly changes the templates by changing the way we experience the memories – so when the unconscious mind tries to match the patterns, they don’t match anymore and the anxiety is no longer triggered. The templates (memories) will still be there, they will just feel different. The emotional tag will be gone. The phobia just won’t work anymore.

This can all be done very quickly because the brain learns very fast. It learned to be phobic very fast. Teaching it how not to be phobic can be, and is necessarily, equally fast. It does not take long-term treatment. The mind can then start to generalise outwards, but this time in a very positive way, as it begins to associate more and more situations with feelings of calm and control.

One of the great things about The Rewind Technique is that it is non-intrusive: the therapist doesn’t need to know the precise details of the traumatic memories or phobic encounters because the sufferer brings their content (their experiences) to the process.

If you have a fear of driving then you can experience The Rewind Technique for yourself because our program uses a specially adapted version to work with driving phobias.

 

How do driving phobias start?

Pretty well all driving phobias are set up by a one-off learning event.

It would be natural to assume that this event has to be something really traumatic and life-threatening like a road traffic accident. But if it had been, it would most likely create some form of short-lived post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and a natural avoidance of driving for some time afterwards and this is slightly different in nature and structure to a driving phobia. So many people with a fear of driving will say they don’t know when their thing started because they are searching their minds for something horrific.

The reality is that probably 95% or more of driving phobias start with something milder – like suddenly feeling a little strange when driving at speed on a multi-lane highway. Something like:

“I was just driving along and I tried to overtake a truck….. and couldn’t do it and felt a bit panicky and weird…. and managed to drive on then thought nothing of it until it happened again the next day.”

This kind of experience would probably hold true for more than half of all set-up events for driving phobias.

If you are following the math(s) then you can see that there is a 9 out of 10 chance that your driving phobia was caused by a relatively mild, one-off learning event. There is a high probability that it started on a multi-lane highway when you were much more stressed than usual.

Making sense of driving phobia

The most frustrating thing about a driving phobia – indeed about any phobia – is that it doesn’t seem to make sense.

Part of you knows that you are probably a good, competent driver and that nothing else has changed. You have the driving experience and the skills. The roads and traffic are still the same. But no matter what you tell yourself – or others tell you (if you’ve had the courage to tell anyone about your driving phobia) – all the logic and reason doesn’t make any difference because the irrational unconscious mind kicks in and says “No, feel frightened, feel scared”.

So a fear of driving will often start to affect self-confidence and self-esteem. “Why me? Why can’t I change this?”.

Probably even more frustrating, willpower doesn’t seem to change a fear of driving either. Other things in life respond to willpower and effort: you apply some willpower and they change. But the driving phobia doesn’t. Well, again, that’s because it’s a different part of your mind that’s been driving the fear. Willpower is a function of your conscious mind and has little effect on your powerful unconscious, especially when it’s talking “survival”.

But a driving phobia does make some sense at an unconscious level. The unconscious mind is trying to protect you from what it began to imagine were life-threatening driving situations. It attached all kinds of uncomfortable feelings to those situations to try and make it so uncomfortable you wouldn’t even go there, so by it’s own “logic” you would stay safe and survive.

So any effective driving phobia treatment needs to work with the creative unconscious mind that created the fear to start with. And that is exactly what our program does: it uses a range of powerful psychological tools to decondition the fear responses and install some calm patterns for future so you can drive in comfort and feel in control again.

If driving phobia was all to do with logic and reason then you wouldn’t have a driving phobia and you wouldn’t need our program.

Can driving simulators help?

A new phobia treatment centre has opened in Spain (Burmin Institute) which uses virtual reality simulators to treat a range of phobias and anxiety states. The treatment – called virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) – is based on Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) whereby gradual exposure to the feared situation in a controlled virtual world is intended to reduce or extinguish the fear responses.

Over the years there has also been research into the efficacy of virtual reality treatments on driving phobia. For example the study by The University of Manchester (Science Daily).

These studies show some benefit although it can be a slow process – often taking 12 sessions over 3 months – and a costly one (creating and running the advanced simulators is expensive).

Far better then to use the greatest virtual reality simulator know to man: the human brain. Everyone’s got one and access is quick and free. But using it correctly is the trick. In fact, it’s the misuse of this wonderful simulator – the human imagination – that creates so many problems in the first place.

That’s why we can terrify ourselves with nightmares and phobics can scare themselves just by thinking about their phobic trigger. A driving phobic just has to think about a future journey and the imagination will kick in and create a disaster movie of it in their head. The brain struggles to distinguishing between reality and this near-perfect simulation and starts to trigger basic survival responses and can tip them into panic even before they get anywhere near a car.

So what we do in the MindSpa Phobia Clinic when treating the fear of driving and other phobias is to utilise the power of this virtual reality simulator using a variety of tools which rely strongly on directed visualisations to decondition the phobic patterns and responses and install calm ones for future. This can all be done in a very safe and controlled way and very quickly – typically in one or two sessions.

Life in the slow lane?

With driving phobias, not only does the driving itself become physically and emotionally exhausting, but huge amounts of time and mental energy are used in planning and then driving alternative routes or else using public transport.

This is life in the slow lane.

The avoidance and manipulation takes effort too.

All this starts to put pressure on work, social and family life. No longer being able to drive to work, go to the shops, visit family and friends, take the children out on trips and holidays or just drop them off at school and parties has a huge impact on day-to-day living.

Add in the embarrassment and self-doubt (“what’s wrong with me?”) to the loss of freedom, independence and spontaneity, and driving phobia becomes a real limit on living.

Amazingly though, many sufferers will accommodate driving phobia in their lives for years and even decades, believing that they are alone and no-one will understand their fear of driving or be able to help. Some will be lucky enough to have opportunities not to drive at all: perhaps their partner does it all, or they live in a metropolis with congested roads and good public transport or have a private driver.

Most drivers though will get to a point – maybe because of a particularly uncomfortable incident or a change in personal circumstances – when they think “enough is enough” and do something about it. And get help.

Case Study: The Psychiatrist

A psychiatrist who had driven very happily for many years developed a driving phobia when her grandmother became very ill.

Her grandmother was in a care home an hour’s drive away and the only times the psychiatrist could visit her was before she went to work each day. So she would get up early, drive out to see her grandmother and then drive on to work.

This became very stressful because not only was she stressed by her grandmother being unwell, she was getting up very early each day and this was exhausting her. Added to that her visits were always very upsetting with her grandmother always begging her not to leave her there.

One day, after a visit to her grandmother she experienced a moment of mild panic when driving to the office. This was the beginning of her driving phobia. It was brought on by physical and emotional stress.

Not wanting to self-medicate with drugs (few doctors we see take their own medicine), she came to the MindSpa Phobia Clinic for help and was so surprised by the result that she is now studying the techniques we use in the clinic because all her training had led her to believe that change could not happen so quickly.

What driving fear sticks to

Driving phobias start for very similar reasons (usually raised background stress levels leading to panic) but because the initial set-up event will happen in different situations for different people, driving phobia becomes linked to different things for different people.

So driving phobias can attach to:

  • Driving on wide open roads like multi-lane highways (most common)
  • Major or trunk roads
  • Small roads
  • Hills (or even slight inclines up or down)
  • High, mountainous roads
  • Bridges
  • Flyovers
  • Bends
  • Cambers
  • Junctions
  • Roadworks
  • Traffic lights
  • Particular routes
  • Overtaking (especially large or long vehicles)
  • Being boxed in by heavy traffic
  • Being tail-gated
  • Being close to particular vehicles (usually large or high-sided ones)

Driving phobias often start on multi-lane highways and spread to dual carriageways, then to smaller roads restricting the routes, speed and distances that can be traveled.

Drive-o-phobia?

The clinical name for driving phobia is not Drive-o-phobia.

In fact there is no recognized clinical name for a phobia of driving. Which is quite an omission for such a common phobia.

Some therapists refer to the fear of driving as Hodophobia but that is far too general as it is defined as a fear of travelling (from the Greek word Hodo meaning: going, movement, travelling). This is a very different thing from a driving phobia which attaches specifically to driving and often to very specific driving situations.